6 Major Decorating Tips From Tiny House Owners | Apartment Therapy

From the good folks over at Apartment Therapy:

Decorating a tiny house? The only way to go is up. Not only does designing vertically create the illusion of a clean, clutter-free space, but it can also trick guests into thinking your home is bigger.

“Store items high and low, and out of the eye-line to make spaces seem bigger,” Spesard says.

Take advantage of the space underneath your bed and couch, and install a hanging pot holder in your kitchen.

They say “tiny house,” but on Russian Hill we know this is de rigeur for “apartment living.”

When it comes to making some of these ideas a reality in your studio or flat, we can help make that happen.

Many of these ideas were the inspiration for the start of Russian Hill Handyman Co. — if you’ve seen the loft bed in Rick’s apartment, you’ll know what we mean.

Two tiny house experts share their best decorating tips.

Source: 6 Major Decorating Tips From Tiny House Owners | Apartment Therapy

Rental Updates that Won’t Upset Your Landlord | Apartment Therapy

You see a lot of posts on this site from Apartment Therapy. Though we consider the site a shadow of its former self in terms of scope and layout, we find its audience to be tightly in line with ours — city renters trying to make the most out of their urban homes — and we see value in a lot of the ideas they share.

One of those ideas is how to make improvements to your apartment that won’t conflict with your lease. Have a look at this page for their ideas, and even more in the comments section!

I’ve been in my rented apartment for three years and it’s starting to look a little dingy — water stains from a rainy winter have become a white-wall eyesore, my old bathroom never looks clean, even when it is, and the bedroom carpet has started to lose its newness. I’ve refreshed it in ways that are mostly on the cheap and won’t challenge my lease agreement, and thought I’d share them here.

by Theresa Gonzalez
Nov 29, 2017
ApartmentTherapy.com

5. Switch out light fixtures.
For my bedroom I wanted to wake up to something a little nicer, lighter than the cheap brass fixture that came with the place. I hired an electrician to replace it with a George Nelson lamp and will likely hire him again to replace it when I move out. The work cost about $60.

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6. Add new hardware.
The cabinet handles that were originally in my kitchen were, to put it mildly, hideous. I swapped those out with simple, modern stainless steel ones from IKEA, and it completely transformed the room. Those can easily go back when I move out, or the landlord can keep mine since they cost so little.

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As always, we can help you out with everything on this list and many more!

via Rental Updates that Won’t Upset Your Landlord | Apartment Therapy